20140516, Jason Lee (In Memory of Xuzhou Campus – C7) (with Evaluation by Jill Huang)

Jason Lee, In Memory of Xuzhou Campus (臺大徐州路校區)

Ladies and gentlemen, where am I? Yes, I am in a classroom, in an old classroom. There is the long, quiet corridor outside. I am in a classical, red-bricks building. Look, this is the bird view of the building. So now, do you know where I am? Yes, I am in the NTU, College of Social Sciences at Xuzhou campus.

This campus is my favorite in NTU. I promise you. Drunken Moon Lake is not romantic enough. Xuzhou Campus is the most beautiful place in NTU. If you haven’t been there, I strongly recommend you to get there once. You must be surprised, that in the crowded, hustle and bustle city center, there is a secluded paradise, with the air of humanity.

This is the front door of the Xuzhou campus. This front door can be traced back to 1922, in the period of Japanese colony. Taipei Senior Commercial School was established. This is the first classroom, and the second classroom, which were also built in 1922. These buildings have a history of 92 years. And this is how it look like now.
On the left of the front door is the administration building, built in 1925. These buildings are feature in western classical style, like greek columns and semi-circular arches. But their roofs are all covered with Japanese black tiles. Here is the little square garden in the administration building. What’s more, don’t forget that on the right of the front door, there is a tiny, delicate guard house, also built in 1925. These buildings are all historical sites announced by Taipei city government. This was the model of the school in that time.

In 1947, when the sovereignty had transferred to Chinese government, Taipei Senior Commercial School was incorporated into National Taiwan University, School of Law. Initially, there were 4 departments, law, politics, economy, and business.

This is the Law and Social Science Branch Library, established in 1963. It has been used for half a century. I like to study there more than the main library. It’s quiet with not many users. This great resource is only for students there.

If you like to walk, just like I do, walking around the campus is an enjoyment. The sunlight splits on the red-brick classroom, the shadow of these palm trees swaying. Time stops here. Here is the place for learning, cultivating and meditating. Imagine that in the 1970’s, the busiest time in the Xuzhou campus, lot’s of students from many departments studied in these classrooms. They have become elites in all sectors today.

Now, the Xuzhou campus is not as busy as the 70’s. In 1987, College of Management was set up, and moved to the main campus. In 1999, the original School of Law was divided into two, College of Law and College of Social Sciences. In 2009, college of law moved to the main campus. Now, this Xuzhou campus is only for COSS. But it is about to move to the main campus in the next semester. Sadly, it means this semester is my last semester to learn in this campus. Precisely, I only have 5 weeks left. This is the new building of my college in the main campus.

Frankly, I am so lucky to be soon using this avant-guard designer’s building, new classrooms, and great equipments. I am honored to stand on the turning point of our college, and to go from the old to the new. However, during my first two years of college life, I feel so fortunate and appreciate to have used the old classrooms in the Xuzhou campus. Studying in the ancient campus brings me a really different feeling. It possesses an atmosphere which the newest couldn’t have. Don’t forget: It’s history and spirit cannot be diluted. TME.

 

—————- Evaluation by Jill Huang (NCCU) —————-

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